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Published on October 19, 2010

Kish Hospital Workers Raise Hands for Breast Cancer Awareness

October 19, 2010 

Two employees send a special message

Kishwaukee Community Hospital workers in pink gloves gathered in the hospital’s digital mammography room Oct. 14, to send a Breast Cancer Awareness Month message about the importance of early detection. Those in the photo include radiologists, a surgeon, radiology technicians and numerous clinical and support staff.

Front and center are Chris Sarver (left) and Carolyn Acosta.  

Kishwaukee Community Hospital workers in pink gloves gathered in the hospital’s digital mammography room Oct. 14, to send a Breast Cancer Awareness Month message about the importance of early detection.

Chris, a 14-year employee and development assistant for KishHealth Foundation, is an advocate for annual mammography screening.  As a result of her mammo last year at age 50, a Stage 1 invasive tumor was discovered. Chris is now five months post chemotherapy and radiation treatment. 

“Without the mammogram, the tumor could have spread before I even knew about it, and it could have been a much worse prognosis for me.  Don’t put off your annual mammogram,” Chris says. The American Cancer Society recommends annual mammograms starting at age 40.

Carolyn, a 15-year employee and administrative assistant for the KishHealth Emergency Medical Services System, recently participated in a follow-up Pink Glove dance video filmed in Chicago. The video was produced by Medline, the makers of the pink hospital gloves.  Medline produced the original Pink Glove dance video at a hospital in the state of Oregon that became an overnight YouTube sensation.

Carolyn learned about Medline’s second video through Connie Snider of Kish Hospital’s 

Purchasing Department, who knew about Carolyn’s passion for the breast cancer cause. Carolyn told Medline her story and was invited to join the video, which was shot on Aug.22, in Chicago at Northerly Island with the  Chicago skyline as the backdrop. Chicago is the last segment featured in the dance video and the only segment that includes breast cancer survivors and healthcare workers dancing  together.

“The filming of the video was very inspiring; one of the Chicago survivor dancers was a 93-year-old Grandmother.  The breast cancer survivors are so genuinely appreciative of all healthcare workers. One of my favorite moments of the filming was at the end of the video shoot when we all stood together to form a breast cancer ribbon. Everyone standing together to make a difference, that is really what it is all about,” said Carolyn.

The past summer Carolyn participated in the Susan G. Komen 3-Day Walk for the Cure, raising over $2,700 and walking a total of 60 miles in 3 days.  

“I feel that raising money for breast cancer will also help to find a cure for other cancers.  My father has been diagnosed twice with prostate cancer and my aunt passed away from colon cancer, so I am determined to do whatever I can to end cancer”.

While walking in the 3-day walk, Carolyn met Justin who told the story of his 25-year-old sister Janette. Ovarian cancer was discovered during her unsuccessful attempts to get pregnant, which was followed by a total hysterectomy.  Then breast tumors were found resulting in a double mastectomy.  Sadly, brain tumors were just discovered the day before the 3-day walk. 

“‘Why are you walking Justin asked me?  I’m walking for your sister,’ I said.  “His story and others I heard at the walk are what continue to motivate me. I have already signed up for next year’s 3-day walk and also recently completed the Chicago Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure,”  Carolyn said.

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